Dear Conservative Coalition Voter

Please do not rant at me about the ALP’s inability to manage an economy when your cretin of a leader opposed the Stimulus Package, which has been praised by economists (YOUR demigods).

Much love to you and your doomed children,

The Culture Sniper.

x x x

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About culturesniper

The Sniper The Sniper tries to keep her (shit) ‘their’ identity secret, but basically anyone who reads this knows who she is. Anyway. The facade is fun. The Sniper is a militant agnostic, fervent supporter of gay rights, and out-and-proud NERD. She kinda likes Jesus. She kinda likes Buddha. She kinda likes Harry Potter, for much the same reasons. The Sniper works in the creative industries. That’s why she has all these whacky progressive ideas. What a fruit loop, hey? She has some stuff to say. This is where she says it. You can contact the sniper at theculturesniper@gmail.com

10 thoughts on “Dear Conservative Coalition Voter

  1. A young conservative says:

    Although economic historian Niall Ferguson, an multi-award winning professor at Harvard, advocated a quite different approach. To quote:

    ”You have a fantastic opportunity to do things that other Anglo-Saxon countries can only dream of. You should be setting up a sovereign wealth fund like Norway. You had the golden opportunity, but it was frittered away in a pseudo-Keynesian spending binge.”

    So regardless of the oppositions policies, the debate is not quite closed on whether Labor’s reckless stimulus package was the best approach to stave off the downturn. Classical Keynesian economics is not necessarily suited to a new world order. These theories were formulated in th

  2. A young conservative says:

    Although economic historian Niall Ferguson, an multi-award winning professor at Harvard, advocated a quite different approach. To quote:

    ”You have a fantastic opportunity to do things that other Anglo-Saxon countries can only dream of. You should be setting up a sovereign wealth fund like Norway. You had the golden opportunity, but it was frittered away in a pseudo-Keynesian spending binge.”

    So regardless of the oppositions policies, the debate is not quite closed on whether Labor’s reckless stimulus package was the best approach to stave off the downturn. Classical Keynesian economics is not necessarily suited to a new world order. These theories were formulated in the Victorian era.

  3. Kaine Hayward says:

    That may well be the case, but perhaps Ferguson is looking at an excessively big picture. The “pseudo Keynesian spending binge” did exactly what it was designed to do, and prevented high unemployment and recession in the immediate future. It’s all well and good to argue that it would be better to financially insure ourselves for the inevitable downfall of Western civilisation and the rise of Asia, precipitated by the GFC, but this ignores the human element of the crisis. Could any government conscionably allow its citizens to suffer extreme financial hardship (including job and home loss) in order to implement an impressive long-term policy? The ultimate usage of the stimulus funds, we can argue about, but there is little doubt that the funds injected into the economy were entirely necessary. Joseph Stiglitz, the Nobel Laureate, thought as much when he lauded the Australian stimulus package as “one of the most impressive economic policies [he had] ever seen”. The reason the Australian stimulus package was successful is entirely because it was so drastic. The Americans spent far less per head, and consequently, they now sit just above 9% unemployment, with foreclosures on homes continuing to affect borrowers. Of course, I am oversimplifying the US/Australia comparison here. Fundamental differences in the characters of our economies also played a significant role, but I doubt that many serious economists would not concede that we would be in a far worse position if not for this spending.
    By the way, Young Conservative, John Maynard Keynes formulated the most influential of his ideas in the 1930s and 40s. History has proved that his radical monetary ideas at the close of WW2, if implemented in preference to the current Bretton-Woods System, would have prevented a number of currency disasters.

  4. Ann says:

    Excuse me Kaine, but how exactly does an extra $1000 in my pocket prevent unemploment?

  5. One of the first places to feel an economic downturn is the retail sector. The $1000 kept people spending, which prevents loss of jobs in retail.

    A decline in retail spending leads to a decline in product production which leads to a decline in production employment, middle management ra ra ra. It’s a dominos effect.

    This is a very simplistic explanation, but basically: economy fueled by consumer spending. Stimulus tax rebates kept people spending at a time when they otherwise would have been counting their pennies.

    Pretty straight forward.

  6. Ann Walker says:

    And so what about the large proportion of people who would simply have saved the money as I did?

  7. Ann Walker says:

    The risk you take I guess.

  8. People who saved it do not represent the majority.

    And all this hypothetical conjecture doesn’t change the fact that it DID work, and the common Lib argument that Labor cannot run an economy has been blown out of the water.

    They absolutely CAN run an economy, and they proved it under the most dire economic circumstances the western world has seen in decades. And we came out better than any other western nation.

    That’s not a matter of *opinion*, either. It’s a matter of FACT. It is quantifiable. It is mathematics. This isn’t a qualitative assessment.

    FACT: Australia is better off after the GFC than the UK or the USA. FACT.

    SO my point remains: Liberal voters, find a better reason to hate the ALP than this age-old, antiquated, inaccurate economic stance. It not longer stands up as a solid argument.

  9. Kaine Hayward says:

    I want to know who this culture sniper is. She sounds hot.

  10. She might be a he. And if she is, he’s hot.

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